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Improving the Doctor-Patient Relationship
through Patient Care, Teaching and Research.

Bucksbaum Master Clinicians &
Senior Faculty Scholars

Each year the Bucksbaum Institute will provide substantial funding, to recruit one experienced physician-teacher or to appoint a senior physician hired in the last 12-14 months, each year to the University who will serve for three years as a Bucksbaum Master Clinician. These physicians will be role models for student scholars and faculty scholars in the delivery of excellent clinical care and skilled doctor-patient communication.

Master Clinician
Arlene Chapman, MD

Arlene Chapman, MD (2016)
Department of Medicine

A renowned nephrologist, Arlene Chapman, MD, is dedicated to improving the lives of patients with renal disease. Dr. Chapman’s career has focused on hereditary renal diseases. Dr. Chapman also sees patients with chronic kidney disease of all causes, and those who are pregnant with underlying renal disease.

Dr. Chapman studies personalized or precision medicine and the role that genetic background plays in predicting antihypertensive responses to blood pressure medications used to treat hypertension. Dr. Chapman's early investigations centered on the renal and systemic changes to blood circulation that occur during preeclampsia. She has received continuous funding for her work from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) over the past 18 years.

Dr. Chapman’s academic contributions include membership on several NIH committees as well as the Scientific Advisory Council for the Polycystic Kidney Disease Research Foundation and the Council for the American Kidney Societies. Dr. Chapman is the current director of the Clinical Resource Center for the Institute of Translational Medicine in the Biological Sciences Division at the University of Chicago. She has published nearly 170 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, and previously served on the editorial boards for American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Kidney International and the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

In addition, Dr. Chapman is a dedicated mentor and educator for medical students, interns and residents. She is actively involved in teaching fellows about various topics in nephrology and guides them in their research.

Neil Hyman, MD

Neil Hyman, MD (2015)
Department of Surgery

Dr. Hyman received his BA from the University of Pennsylvania in 1980 and his M.D. from the University of Vermont College of Medicine in 1984. He completed his surgical internship and residency at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, New York, and his colon and rectal fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio.

Dr. Hyman is currently Professor of Surgery, Chief of the Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery and Codirector of the Center for Digestive Diseases at the University of Chicago Medicine. He has authored more than 175 peer-reviewed original articles or textbook chapters.

Dr. Hyman serves on many regional and national committees, and is a member of numerous national organizations and societies. He has been President of the Vermont Chapter of the American College of Surgeons, Associate Editor of Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Principle Investigator of the New England and Vermont Colorectal Cancer Quality Project, and Chairman of the Standards Committee of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. He is Treasurer of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and its Research Foundation, serves on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery, is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery and Chairs the ACS Advisory Council for Colon and Rectal Surgery.

He is the recipient of many teaching awards including Clinical Teacher of the Year, University of Vermont, College of Medicine 1993/94, 1994/95 and 1997/98. He has received the Jerome S. Abrams Teaching Award in 1992/93, 1993/94 and 1997/98, the Howe Outstanding Surgery Faculty Award 2000/2001, 2004/2005, 2010/2011 and the Humanism in Medicine Award, University of Vermont, College of Medicine 2001/02. He was designated as Teacher of the Year by the Chief Surgical Residents in 1991, 2007, 2009 and 2014 at UVM, and at the University of Chicago where he received the Robert Baker Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015.

In 2005, he delivered the Commencement Address at the UVM College of Medicine graduation, was voted as Physician of the Year by the Vermont State Medical Society in 2011, and received the Distinguished Academic Achievement Award from the Alumni Association of the University of Vermont College of Medicine in 2014.

Nir Uriel, MD

Nir Uriel, MD (2015)
Department of Medicine

Dr. Nir Uriel is an Associate Professor of Medicine and is the Director of the Heart Failure, Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support. Dr. Uriel is a leader in the field of heart failure, mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. He specializes in caring for patients who require mechanical circulatory support, including ventricular assist devices (VADs). Dr. Uriel’s research focuses on advanced heart failure physiology, heart transplant and mechanical circulatory support. He has a strong interest in high-risk transplant populations, including HIV-positive patients and patients who have received mediastinal radiation due to tumors or prior transplants. Through his research, Dr. Uriel has improved treatment protocols and patient care for these high-risk groups. Dr. Uriel has published more than 80 original, peer-reviewed articles.

Douglas Dirschl, MD

Douglas Dirschl, MD (2014)
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitative Medicine

Douglas R. Dirschl, MD, is a highly accomplished surgeon and an expert in orthopaedics. He specializes in caring for patients with musculoskeletal trauma and fractures, as well as other injuries and diseases of the bones, joints and muscles.

Dr. Dirschl’s research focuses on the assessment of factors that influence reliability in classifying fractures. He has studied the quality of radiographs, as well as the use of decision-making strategies to enhance reliability. Dr. Dirschl also studies the biological basis of surgery, including the relationship between hemorrhage in pelvic fractures and pelvic bleeding. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

A leader in medical education and health policy, Dr. Dirschl teaches medical students, residents and physicians about orthopaedic trauma, musculoskeletal pathophysiology and fractures. He has authored three books, more than 30 book chapters, and more than 75 peer-reviewed scholarly articles. In addition, Dr. Dirschl sits on editorial and review boards for several notable scientific journals, including the Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, and Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Dr. Dirschl previously served as president of the American Orthopaedic Association.

Jessica Kandel, MD

Jessica Kandel, MD (2014)
Departments of Surgery and Pediatrics

Jessica J. Kandel, MD, is an expert in pediatric surgery. She specializes in the treatment of pediatric cancers, including Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma, as well as vascular anomalies (hemangiomas, venous malformations, lymphatic malformations).

Dr. Kandel’s research focuses on the development and differentiation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) in solid tumors and vascular anomalies. She was a leader in early studies that suppressed tumor growth by blocking vascular endothelial growth factor, a protein that stimulates angiogenesis. Dr. Kandel’s work contributed to the development of bevacizumab, a drug used to manage metastatic colorectal, lung, and kidney cancers.

As the primary investigator on several long-term studies, Dr. Kandel’s current goal is to understand how tumors become resistant to therapies in order to identify new treatments for refractory cancers. Her research has been funded by notable organizations including the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, and the Pediatric Cancer Foundation.

Dr. Kandel has contributed widely to medical literature, publishing more than 60 peer-reviewed articles and three book chapters on angiogenesis and tumor growth. She currently serves as an editor for Oncology Letters and as an ad hoc reviewer for several other scientific journals. In addition, Dr. Kandel is a popular speaker and a dedicated educator, mentoring medical students, residents, and fellows on a range of research projects related to tumor modeling.

Michael Bishop, MD

Michael Bishop, MD (2013)
Department of Medicine

Michael R. Bishop, MD, specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas and leukemias. In particular, he cares for patients with hematologic malignancies that have not responded to first-line treatments. An expert in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (bone marrow transplantation), Dr. Bishop and his team are working to address the unique social, economic, physiological and biological issues that patients face while undergoing this treatment.

Dr. Bishop’s research focuses on the prevention and treatment of relapse after stem cell transplantation. Relapse is the primary cause of treatment failure and death after stem cell transplantation. He has served as the primary investigator on studies designed to prevent and treat disease recurrence after transplantation. Specifically, he works on ways to enhance immune effects of the transplanted cells against cancer.

An active contributor to medical literature, Dr. Bishop has authored more than 150 peer-reviewed articles, in addition to more than 30 book chapters and two books on cancer treatment and research. He also serves on the editorial board of numerous scientific journals, including Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Dr. Bishop is a dedicated mentor, teaching residents and fellows in classroom, clinical and research settings. Many of his past trainees hold leadership roles in medical oncology and immunology at academic medical centers or at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland.

Since 2001, Dr. Bishop has consistently been named one of the "Best Doctors in America" by Best Doctors, Inc. He previously served as a senior investigator and as the clinical head of stem cell transplantation for the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health.

2013 Pilot Grant Project: A Pilot Program of Cost Communication in Hematologic Malignancies

Ross Milner

Ross Milner, MD (2012)
Department of Surgery

Dr. Milner attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania and then completed his residency training in General Surgery as well as fellowship training in Vascular Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He received numerous teaching awards during his time as a resident and fellow at Penn. At the end of his fellowship, he was awarded the Marco Polo Fellowship from the Society for Vascular Surgery. As the Marco Polo Fellow, he worked at the University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands studying aortic aneurysmal disease and endovascular therapy. He performed the initial work investigating the value of remote pressure sensor use for surveillance of aneurysms after endovascular repair.

Following the fellowship, he joined the faculty at Emory University first as Assistant Professor and later as Associate Professor and Program Director of the Vascular Surgery fellowship. He moved to Chicago in 2009 after accepting the position of Chief of Vascular Surgery at Loyola University Medical Center. In January 2012, he was recruited to the University of Chicago Medicine as Associate Professor and Co-Director of the Center for Aortic Diseases. He is passionate about the care of vascular patients with a specific clinical and research focus on aortic aneurysm disease.

2013 Pilot Grant Project: “A Formal Curriculum in Surgical Professionalism and Ethics”: To enhance and encourage the professionalism of surgical residents and their understanding of the central concepts of surgical ethics

2013 Pilot Grant Project: Improving Professionalism for Physicians in Training: A Curriculum based Approach.

The Senior Faculty Scholar program is another new addition to the Bucksbaum Institute. Senior Faculty Scholars are a group of outstanding clinicians and teachers who are current members of the University faculty, and who personify the mission and goals of the Bucksbaum Institute to improve the doctor-patient relationship and the care of patients. As a Bucksbaum Institute Senior Faculty Scholar, each senior faculty member is asked to mentor, coach and advise Bucksbaum Institute Student, Junior Faculty and Associate Junior Faculty Scholars.

2015-16 Senior Faculty Scholars
Jeanne Farnan, MD

Jeanne Farnan, MD
Department of Medicine

Dr. Jeanne Farnan is Associate Professor of Medicine and Assistant Dean for Curricular Development and Evaluation at the Pritzker School of Medicine. She currently is leading new initiatives to perform comprehensive curricular review and adoption of competency-based medical education initiatives. Dr. Farnan is also Director of Clinical Skills Education and the Medical Director of the Clinical Performance Center. She is intimately involved with educating medical students in communication and physical examination skills throughout their time at Pritzker, as well as co-directing several well-subscribed electives which help graduating students transition to their graduate medical education training. Finally, Dr. Farnan’s scholarly interests focus on topics including professionalism and social media usage amongst physicians, communication during patient care transitions and supervision during residency training.

David Glick, MD

David Glick, MD
Department of Anesthesia & Critical Care

Dr. David Glick is a Professor in the Department of Anesthesia & Critical Care. His clinical interests include the anesthetic management of vascular, thoracic and head and neck cancer patients as well as the care of patients in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (for which he has been the medical director since 2002). His research interests cover a wide range of clinical questions including the feasibility of processed EEG monitoring to decrease the risk of intra-operative awareness, the incidence of and risk factors for the development of deep venous clots around the time of surgery, ways to facilitate emergence from general anesthetics in children and patients for whom English is not the first language, the value and impact of surgical quality metrics, and the optimization of awake intubation techniques. He has published widely in these areas and students and residents in his lab have presented well over 100 abstracts at national and international meetings. He has received multiple awards for teaching and research mentorship and has been a track leader/cluster group leader for the clinical research tracks of the Pritzker Summer Research Program and the Scholarship & Discovery track for many years.

Vinay Kumar, MD

Vinay Kumar, MD
Department of Pathology

Dr Vinay Kumar is the Alice Hogge and Arthur Baer Distinguished Service Professor and Chairman of the department of Pathology at the University of Chicago. He has made seminal contributions in the field of medical education and basic research. In 1974 his laboratory identified Natural Killer (NK) cells as a distinct population of lymphocytes with anti-tumor activities. Continuation of this work has led to discovery of NK cell receptors and the immunotherapeutic use of NK cells. He was elected to the American Association Advancement of Science for this “pioneering work on discovery of NK cells”. He is a passionate medical educator and has influenced medical education across the world for the past 35 years as the editor/author of Robbins Pathology text books. He is the senior editor of these books now in their 9th edition. Robbins Pathology is the most widely used medical text in the world with translations into 13 languages. He has served on the US National Board of medical Examiners as test writer and he recently coauthored a report on competency based education commissioned by AAMC/HHMI. He has played an active role in curricular reforms globally with special interest in his native India. He believes that technology can be a powerful democratizing force in medical education and is developing innovative ways to use technology for educating health science professionals.

Michael Lee, MD

Michael Lee, MD
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitative Medicine

Dr. Michael Lee is an accomplished orthopaedic spine surgeon who treats a broad spectrum of pathology from a simple disc herniation to complex tumor and deformity of the spinal column.

Dr Lee’s research interests are similarly broad. His oft-cited publications include shared decision-making with patients to the stability of the spine using biomechanical cadaveric models to models predicting the safety of spine surgery based on individualized patient and surgical factors. His work led to the SpineSage web model for predicting complication after spine surgery (SpineSage.com). He has presented his research internationally. He has authored 2 textbooks, chaired 4 courses, acquired several grants to support his research and has more than 80 peer-reviewed publications. He also writes a regular column in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research focusing on patient safety.

In addition to his research accomplishments, he has been an invited speaker at several national courses teaching surgical spine techniques to other practicing spine surgeons. He serves as manuscript reviewer for several journals including Spine and The Spine Journal.

Michael Marcangelo, MD

Michael Marcangelo, MD
Department of Psychiatry

Dr. Marcangelo is a consultation-liaison psychiatrist and psychiatric educator. He joined the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience in 2008 and has served as the Director of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry ever since. In this role, he directs the psychiatric clerkship and is the director of the Human Behavior in Health and Illness course for second year Pritzker students. He has researched the use of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations in psychiatric evaluation. He is also a founding member of the Clinical Skills Initiative Taskforce for the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry. In this role he has participated in the development of nearly a dozen clinical modules that are being used internationally to facilitate psychiatric education of medical students. Clinically, Dr. Marcangelo has served on the inpatient psychiatry consult service at the University of Chicago since 2008, each year providing over 500 psychiatric consultations for patients in the hospital. He has also served as the director of the transplant psychiatry program and evaluates approximately 100 transplant candidates each year. He has worked with the liver transplant team and currently works with the kidney, heart, and lung transplant teams. He also maintains an active psychotherapy practice.

J. Michael Millis, MD

J. Michael Millis, MD
Department of Surgery

Michael Millis, MD, Professor of Surgery at the University of Chicago since 1994 is the Chief of the Section of Transplantation and Director of the University of Chicago Transplant Center. He is certified by the American Board of Surgery in both General Surgery and Surgical Critical Care. He is an internationally renowned expert in pediatric and adult liver transplantation. Dr. Millis has pioneered new techniques of operating on the liver, and has performed more liver transplants than any other surgeon in the region. He is know for his clinical technical skills as well as developing supportive relationships with his patients and their families.

Recognized for his successful interactions with China and other resource challenged areas, lead to his appointment as Vice Chair for Global Surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine in 2015. His goal is to broaden efforts to the increasingly important emerging area of Global Surgery, coordinate and strengthen clinical, research, educational, and humanitarian efforts for faculty, trainees, and students.

Dr. Millis’s research explores the application of cellular technology to patient care. For instance, he is investigating how hepatocyte transplantation, extracorporeal assist technology and stem cells can assist in the care of patients with liver disease or liver tumors. His research interests also include health and policy ethics. He is currently engaged with former Vice Minister of Health of the People’s Republic of China and current Director of the Organ Transplant and Donor Committee, Jiefu Huang, to help improve the practice and policy of transplantation in China, which is supported by the China Medical Board. He has been instrumental in assisting China move from the use of organs from executed prisoners to a voluntary citizen based organ donation system. He has co-authored articles published in high profile journals such as Lancet with Vice Minister Huang regarding changes in transplant regulation and policy in China.

Dr. Millis has been host to dozens of physicians and scientists from China desiring clinical and scientific experience in the United States. His focus in surgical research has been clinical and translational studies aimed primarily on improving graft and patient survival suffering from liver disease. In addition he has organized multiple clinical trials in China and is also a member of Chicago’s Sister City Committee. Dr. Millis has authored or co-authored more than 100 articles in medical journals and has visited and lectured at hundreds of universities and medical centers around the world.

Olufunmilayo Olopade, MD, FACP, OON

Olufunmilayo Olopade, MD, FACP, OON
Department of Medicine

Dr. Olopade, a board certified internist and medical oncologist, is the Walter L. Palmer Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics, Dean for Global Health and Director, Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics at The University of Chicago. Dr. Olopade earned her medical degree from the University of Ibadan College of Medicine in Nigeria. She trained in internal medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago and in oncology, hematology and cancer genetics at the Joint Section of Hematology and Oncology at the University of Chicago.

A leader in cancer genetics, Dr. Olopade studies familial forms of cancers, molecular mechanisms of tumor progression in high-risk individuals as well as genetic and non-genetic factors contributing to tumor progression in diverse populations. Her current laboratory research is focused on using whole genome technologies and bioinformatics to develop innovative approaches to democratize precision health care for all and thereby reduce global health disparities.

Dr. Olopade is an expert in cancer risk assessment and individualized treatment for the most aggressive forms of breast cancer based on an understanding of the altered genes in individual patients. She stresses comprehensive risk reducing strategies and prevention in high-risk populations, as well as earlier detection through advanced imaging technologies.

Dr. Olopade is an at-large member of the American Board of Internal Medicine Board of Directors. She is also an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. She has received numerous honors and awards, including honorary degrees from Bowdoin University, Princeton University, North Central College and Dominican University, Doris Duke Distinguished Clinical Scientist and Exceptional Mentor Award, American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professorship, MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, Officer of the Order of the Nigeria Award, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Freedom from Want Award. Dr. Olopade currently serves on the Board of Directors for the National Cancer Advisory Board, Susan G. Komen for the Cure and the Lyric Opera.

Helene Rubeiz, MD

Helene Rubeiz, MD
Department of Neurology

Dr. Helene Rubeiz is Associate Professor of Neurology and has served as the Residency Program Director since 2006. She oversees all aspects of neurology residency training at the University of Chicago. Dr. Rubeiz is a graduate of the American University of Beirut School of Medicine. She did her internship training at the Cleveland Clinic and her Neurology residency training at the University of Chicago. She joined the Neurology faculty at the University of Chicago in 1997. Dr. Rubeiz is routinely involved in supervising/teaching residents and fellows in the clinical setting. Her clinical interests are in general neurology and clinical neurophysiology, particularly electromyography.

Michael Schreiber, MD

Michael Schreiber, MD
Department of Pediatrics

Michael Schreiber, MD, is an expert in neonatal-perinatal medicine and pediatric critical care. He is a member of a multidisciplinary team of specialists that treats more than 1,000 premature and critically ill babies each year.

Dr. Schreiber’s research focuses on finding new and better therapies to improve the care and quality of life for premature babies. He served as the director of two important studies showing that inhaled nitric oxide reduced the risk of physical and developmental complications related to premature birth. Dr. Schreiber is also interested in ethical issues associated with neonatal and pediatric intensive care.

A popular teacher and speaker, Dr. Schreiber has lectured at universities, hospitals and medical meetings around the world. He is an author on more than two hundred scientific reports. In addition, he serves as an ad hoc reviewer for many medical publications including the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of Perinatology, Pediatric Research, Journal of Pediatrics, and the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Mindy Schwartz, MD

Mindy Schwartz, MD
Department of Medicine

Dr. Mindy Schwartz is the co-recipient of this years Faculty Physician Peer Role Model Award. Dr. Schwartz joined the faculty in 1987 as a faculty in the Primary Care Group, and has held a faculty position in the Section of General Internal medicine. She has maintained a busy clinical practice in addition to holding a variety of positions in the medical school and in the internal medicine residency program. Dr. Schwartz has been an award-winning teacher and was elected in 2010 as a Master of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine Academy of Distinguished Medical Educators. Over the past 10 year she has studied and taught medical history to the medical students and to internal medicine residents. In May 2014, she was the local arrangements chair for the national organization of medical historians – the American Association for the History of Medicine.

In addition to her current academic interests, she has taught Nutrition in Health and disease in the Pritzker School of Medicine from 2001-9.

Dr. Schwartz currently serves as one of the medical school advisors- serving along with Brian Callender as the head of the Coggeshall Society. She also serves as the, Chapter advisor for the Gold Humanism Honor Society and she was Former Associate Program Director and Chair of the Internship Selection Committee for the Department of Medicine from 1994-2004.

Stephen Weber, MD

Stephen Weber, MD
Department of Medicine

Dr. Stephen G. Weber is the Chief Medical Officer and Vice President for Clinical Effectiveness at the University of Chicago Medicine. He is an Associate Professor in the Section of Infectious Diseases and Global Health.

Dr. Weber received his MD from the New York University School of Medicine and performed his residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago, where he also served as Chief Medical Resident. He completed his subspecialty fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, where he also received a Master’s Degree in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Since returning to the University of Chicago in 2002, Dr. Weber has served in a number of leadership roles focused on clinical quality and patient safety. He was the Chief Healthcare Epidemiologist and Medical Director of Infection Control from 2002-2011, and also served as the Medical Director of the Center for Quality from 2006-2011. He was later elected by the clinical faculty to serve as President of the Medical Staff in 2009. He assumed the position of Chief Medical Officer and Vice President for Clinical Effectiveness in May of 2011.

Dr. Weber has been recognized for his outstanding teaching by the University of Chicago Medicine Residency Program and is a two-time recipient of the Department of Medicine’s Outstanding Clinical Service Award. He has been recognized for his achievement in clinical research by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. His primary focus of investigation is the prevention of infection with multi-drug resistant organisms among hospitalized patients.

Dana Suskind, MD

Dana Suskind, MD
Departments of Surgery and Pediatrics

Dana Suskind, author of the upcoming book, Thirty Million Words: Building A Child’s Brain, (Dutton, September 2015), is Professor of Surgery at the University of Chicago, Director of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program and Founder and Director of the Thirty Million Words Initiative. Based on scientific research that shows the critical importance of early language exposure on the developing child, Thirty Million Words helps parents enhance their home language environment in order to optimize their child's brain development and, therefore, his or her ability to learn. An evidence-based intervention, Thirty Million Words is supported by a broad coalition of public and private partnerships and is an extension of Dr. Suskind’s Project ASPIRE, which she created to assure that her patients from disadvantaged backgrounds reached their full listening and spoken language potentials. Dr. Suskind’s ultimate goal, and that of her dedicated team, is to help all children reach their full potentials and to close the ever-widening achievement gap.

S. Diane Yamada, MD

S. Diane Yamada, MD
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Dr. Diane Yamada is the Joseph Bolivar DeLee Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Chief of the Section of Gynecologic Oncology at the University of Chicago. An expert in the comprehensive care of women with gynecologic malignancies, Dr. Yamada’s clinical research interests include complex surgery for women with ovarian/fallopian tube cancer and high grade endometrial cancer, the use of intraperitoneal chemotherapy and clinical trials. She is currently the principal investigator for a University of Chicago led multi-institutional randomized phase II placebo controlled clinical trial examining the use of metformin in conjunction with standard chemotherapy followed by metformin maintenance therapy. She is the author or co-author of over 70 publications.

In 2010, Dr. Yamada started the University of Chicago/NorthShore University Health System gynecologic oncology fellowship program and is currently the fellowship program director. She has held a number of national leadership positions including gynecologic oncology division board member for the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG), board of directors member for the Society for Gynecologic Oncology (SGO), chair of the communications committee for SGO, and leader of the gynecologic cancer education committee for the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO).